Diabetic Dog Food

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What is the best type of diabetic dog food to get?

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8 comments

  • Pat T Friday, 17 May 2013 06:47 posted by Pat T

    When we were first diagnosed diabetic, I fed Kallie W/D but found it didn't work well at all with her. We did some research and began preparing a home cooked receipt of boiled chicken or beef with vegetables and brown rice. She did really well on that until we sent a sample off for testing, and found it was missing some nutrients. Dr. Schweiss at VCA Spring Branch found a special food for diabetic dogs called Royal Canine, Gastro low fat. This has been a really good option for us. Kallie now maintains a good weight and (if we can keep her from eating the cat's food)we can keep her glucose regulated. Hope that helps,
    Pat T

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  • Dr Donna Spector Friday, 29 March 2013 12:37 posted by Dr Donna Spector

    Hi Beverly, thanks for your question. It should not be a problem to mix in wet food. As long as you do this every day and it becomes a routine for your dog, you will be able to get the insulin just right and your dog well regulated. Hope this helps. Dr. Donna Spector, VCA Internal Medicine Specialist

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  • BEVERLY CRAWFORD Saturday, 09 March 2013 18:14 posted by BEVERLY CRAWFORD

    I have been feeding my dog Iams Senior Proactive Health kibble, and my vet says that should be fine as we try to sabilize his glucose (he was just diagnosed yesterday). However, in order to get him to eat a regulated times (he normally 'grazes' throughout the day) I want to mix in a bit of wet food. Is this okay? I'm assuming the wet food is high in protein. I worry that if he won't eat his dinner as soon as I pour it, I will have to wait to long for the insulin shot (which almost happened today).

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  • Dr Donna Spector Friday, 01 February 2013 18:22 posted by Dr Donna Spector

    Hi Dean, thanks for your question. In general the parameters for low-fat are 10-12% DM (dry matter); high fiber 12-15% DM; and moderate protein 20-25%. There is not one best food and many diabetic dogs can be well regulated on their normal diet. However, if your dog has issues with pancreatitis or other medical issues your vet may recommend a special diet or one with different restrictions. Hope this helps. Dr. Donna Spector, VCA Internal Medicine Specialist

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  • Dr Donna Spector Friday, 01 February 2013 18:21 posted by Dr Donna Spector

    Hi Dean, thanks for your question. In general the parameters for low-fat are 10-12% DM (dry matter); high fiber 12-15% DM; and moderate protein 20-25%. There is not one best food and many diabetic dogs can be well regulated on their normal diet. However, if your dog has issues with pancreatitis or other medical issues your vet may recommend a special diet or one with different restrictions. Hope this helps. Dr. Donna Spector, VCA Internal Medicine Specialist

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  • DEAN DEANGELIS Wednesday, 30 January 2013 17:37 posted by DEAN DEANGELIS

    What would be considered (percentages)low-fat, high fiber and moderate protein.

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  • Velma Leftwich Tuesday, 20 November 2012 10:36 posted by Velma Leftwich

    I've seen some books about making your own dog food for dogs with diabetes. Has anyone done this and if so can you share your recipe and tell me how it affected your pet?

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  • Dr Donna Spector Friday, 07 September 2012 20:03 posted by Dr Donna Spector

    Hi Charles, thanks for your inquiry. There is not one "best" diabetic food--your veterinarian will help guide you according to your dog's actual needs. Some diabetic dogs are very thin and need to gain weight while others are obese and in need of losing weight. In general, the most commonly recommended food for a diabetic dog is a low-fat, high-fiber diet with a moderate level of protein. While there are prescription diets for diabetic dogs, many diabetic dogs can be regulated using their normal diet if you are consistent with the amount and timing of feeding. Ask your vet what is best for your dog. Good luck. Dr. Donna Spector, VCA Internal Medicine Specialist

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